Patent Damages
23Mar/17Off

DDE holds that pleading compliance with the marking statute is not required

Posted by Chris Marchese

The District of Delaware in Mobile Telecommunications Tech., LLC v. Ruckus Wireless, Inc., Case No. 16-md-02722-LPS-CJB (Judge Stark), addressed a motion to dismiss under Rule 12(b)(6).  Defendants moved to dismiss on the ground that plaintiff’s complaint failed to plead compliance with the marking statute, 35 U.S.C. Section 287.  More specifically, the defendant argued that plaintiff’s complaint should be dismissed with respect to one of the patents because it failed to plead compliance with Section 287 and the patent had expired before the complaint was filed.

Filed under: Marking Continue reading
14Mar/17Off

CAFC issues detailed opinion on comparable licenses, addresses cost savings approach

Posted by Chris Marchese

The Federal Circuit, in Prism Tech. LLC v. Sprint Spectrum L.P., Nos. 2016-1456, 2016-1457 (Fed. Cir. March 6, 2017) (Judge Taranto authoring), issued an opinion addressing comparable license agreements and the cost savings approach for reasonable royalties.  We summarize the opinion here.  The section on comparable license agreements is lengthy and worth reading in full.

6Feb/17Off

NDCA allows evidence of capped royalty/book of wisdom and monetarily unquantified noninfringing alternatives

Posted by Chris Marchese

The Northern District of California, in France Telecom S.A. v. Marvell Semiconductor Inc., (Judge William H. Orrick) (August 28, 2014), addressed motions in limine concerning a variety of issues, including damages issues.  We address a couple damages issues here.

10Jan/17Off

Southern District of Florida Awards Ongoing Royalty and Pre-Judgment Interest

The Southern District of Florida, in Arctic Cat Inc. v. Bombardier Recreational Products, Inc., Case No. 14-cv-62369 (Judge Bloom) (Jan. 3, 2017), awarded Plaintiff an ongoing royalty and pre-judgment interest.

In an earlier order, the Court determined that Plaintiff was entitled to an ongoing royalty based on Defendant’s concession that it is continuing to sell the infringing personal watercrafts and that the jury’s royalty rate of $102.54 per unit set the “floor” for the ongoing royalty rate.  The Court ordered the parties to negotiate an ongoing royalty rate, but mediation was unsuccessful.

30Dec/16Off

EDTX denies exclusion of settlement license and “real estate” apportionment

Posted by Chris Marchese

The Eastern District of Texas, in ZiiLabs, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., (Judge Roy S. Payne) (December 4, 2015), granted in part and denied in part defendant’s motion to exclude various opinions from plaintiff’s damages expert, Robert Mills.

Grounds:

  • Defendant sought to exclude expert’s reliance on litigation settlement license covering 100 patents as not economically comparable and not the most reliable license in the record.
  • Defendants sought to exclude expert’s reliance on licensing negotiations that never resulted in executed licenses, and were not technically comparable.
  • Defendant sought to exclude apportionment based on surface area of accused element on the chip.
  • Defendants sought to exclude expert’s testimony on several economic theories
23Dec/16Off

DDE denies request to strike lost profits opinion re non-patented items; addresses test data admissibility

Posted by Chris Marchese

The District of Delaware, in Masimo Corp. v. Philips Elec. North Am. Corp., (Judge Leonard P. Stark) (October 31, 2016), addressed motions to strike opinions of several experts related to damages.  The experts in question were Michael Keeley (Finance), Joseph Dyro (Technical), Nitin Shah (Technical), Vijai Madisetti (Finance), and Michael Wagner (Finance).  The court granted in part and denied in part the motions.  The key motions are addressed below.

7Dec/16Off

Federal Circuit Opinion Asetek Danmark a/s v. CMI USA Inc. Cites Patent Damages Treatise

Posted by Chris Marchese

In a December 2nd opinion by the Federal Circuit, the court cited Patent Damages Law and Practice as a “leading commentary.” The comprehensive treatise was co-authored by Chris Marchese, one of the bloggers on this site, and has been cited in numerous district courts as well.

6Oct/16Off

EDTX denies exclusion of settlement license and “real estate” apportionment

Posted by Chris Marchese

The Eastern District of Texas, in ZiiLabs, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., (Judge Roy S. Payne) (December 4, 2015), granted in part and denied in part defendant’s motion to exclude various opinions from plaintiff’s damages expert, Robert Mills.

6Sep/16Off

D.Ariz excludes expert for not apportioning the rate, but OKs entire product as base

Posted by Chris Marchese

The District of Arizona, in GoDaddy.com LLC v. RPost Communications Limited, Case No. CV-14-00126-PHX-JAT (Judge James A. Teilborg) (May 10, 2016), excluded the entire report of Defendant’s damages expert, Gregory Smith, but allowed a do-over.

Plaintiff GoDaddy moved to exclude Smith’s testimony under FRE 702, asserting two grounds: (1) Smith inappropriately accounted for non-infringing features in his royalty rate analysis rather than apportioning the royalty base, and (2) because Smith used the entire revenue of the accused product as the royalty base, he necessarily applied the entire market value rule (“EMVR”) but failed to demonstrate that the patented features form the basis of consumer demand.  Defendant RPost denied that Smith applied the EMVR, arguing that the accused products were the smallest saleable unit (“SSU”), and the Federal Circuit has never defined a particular formula for apportioning damages for SSUs.  Smith used the operating margin of the accused products and apportioned the royalty rate instead of the royalty base.

25Aug/16Off

DDE excludes settlement agreements; allows licenses as a “check”; addresses apportionment of accused products & services

Posted by Chris Marchese

The District of Delaware, in ART+Com Innovation GMBH v. Google Inc., Case No. 14-217-RGA (Judge Richard G. Andrews) (April 28, 2016), considered several motions related to royalty calculations. In a previous blog post, we addressed the motion for reconsideration of the 13% apportionment issue addressed below.  This post covers the earlier order addressing that issue plus others.

Plaintiff ART+Com Innovation (“ACI”) challenged the reliance of Google’s expert Reed on seven licenses as a "check" on his reasonable royalty analysis.  Five of these licenses were settlement agreements.  The court excluded these (except as to their lump-sum nature) because they were products of litigation and not economically comparable.  The other two licenses were the product of licensing negotiations.  ACI disputed that these licenses were technologically comparable.  The court allowed these licenses because Reed acknowledged the differences, and his analysis was consonant with using the licenses as a "check" against his reasonable royalty calculations.  The jury could then weigh the evidence for itself.